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Web Design and your Online Business

Welcome to Everyone's blog where you'll find me musing about anything related to online business and web design. One of my favorite pastimes is interviewing other people in the industry about how they deal with the challenges of designing pages for their clients. You will hear about everything from how to attract people to your site to making the page behave for any browser, new or old. If you've got an idea for a blog, or for a radio show on Blog Talk Radio, please drop me a line at blogtalk@everyones.com or just leave a comment here!

Dreamweaver CS6 Webinar Series Begins January 11, 2013

Myra Rhodes - Sunday, November 25, 2012

Everyone’s E-Learning is in the business of helping others learn how to create, not just a website, but an online business.

Back by popular demand, we are offering the entire Dreamweaver CS6 course via a series of webinars. We will be presenting the entire course from 'soup to nuts' via webinar beginning on Thursday January 11th at 10:00am Pacific time. ..

Second Interview with John Gallant Part One – PNG Images

Myra Rhodes - Wednesday, August 25, 2010

In my first interview with John Gallant, we received some insight to the baffling problems encountered by web designers when web pages are viewed in different browsers. In this, the second interview on Blog Talk Radio, John begins with a discussion on how to handle PNG (Portable Network Graphics) files. PNG images, John explains, allow you to ‘see through’ parts of the image that are transparent. They also work well for smooth gradients. Graphics Interchange Format (GIFS) also offer transparency. However, GIFs come with their inherent ‘jagiess’ that make it difficult to fade out to transparency around a curve. With PNGs there is no such thing as jaggies, because rather than going from opaque to transparent, the edges of an irregular image can fade out to transparency. You can then lay the PNG on top of any background and it will show up beautifully. John still recommends JPGs (Joint Photographic Experts Group) for the display of photos. ..

First Interview with CSS Junkie John Gallant Part 3 of 3 parts

Myra Rhodes - Monday, April 26, 2010

This is the third blog in a series from my first interview on Blog Talk Radio with “CSS Junkie”, John Gallant.
The next problem that John addresses, takes us back to the early days of the internet where you may have an image on the page and text above or below it. That was not very pretty looking, so they said, “Why can’t the text flow up into this empty space next to the images?” So the ‘align’ attribute was invented and applied to elements to allow aligning left or right or center and to allow the text to flow around them.  ..

First Interview with CSS Junkie John Gallant Part 2 of 3 parts

Myra Rhodes - Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Continuing my discussion with “css junkie”, John Gallant, another major problem with Internet Explorer version 6 is called ‘hasLayout’. The IE browser decides if the hasLayout property is applied to a box or not. It is triggered when the author applies certain properties to a box such as width or height or floating or absolute positioning. Once a box hasLayout it behaves quite differently than when it doesn’t have layout.
You might think that a simple solution would be to apply hasLayout universally, but there are certain situations where you do not want the hasLayout property to be applied. John cites http://www.satzansatz.de/cssd/onhavinglayout.html for anyone who would like to have a better understanding of hasLayout. ..

First Interview with CSS Junkie John Gallant Part 1 of 3 parts

Myra Rhodes - Saturday, April 17, 2010

John Gallant, also known as CSS Junkie or Big John, has devoted a large part of his career to finding and documenting bugs that occur with CSS (cascading style sheets) and also with jquery and java script in combination with CSS. John was my guest on Blog Talk Radio. His site, www.positioniseverything.net, affectionately referred to as PIE, is where you will find pretty much everything that can go wrong with your CSS when your web page is viewed in Internet Explorer (IE). Before we get into some of the more common bug issues that plague web designers, I asked John why IE is such a problem. It seems that when Microsoft first implemented IE, they had some ideas about how things should be done. It resulted in pages looking ‘a little different’ in IE than they did in other browsers. Some people, according to John, say that Microsoft did it on purpose so that their pages would look better in IE than they did in other browsers and that it was more of a political thing. ..



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